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    Suite 1500 - 701 West Georgia Street
    Vancouver, BC, V7Y1C6
    Canada

    Parenting, Green Living and Aging Well.

    Parenting, Green Living and Family

    Parenting, Green Living and Family

    The Babyhood Stage

    Green Family Hub

    The BabyHood Stage | Images: Aviva Home Health

    Babyhood is a time when babies are totally dependent upon their parents and caregivers for their protection and care.  Consistent, adequate, gentle care can encourage the infant to develop the capacity to trust people.

     

    BIRTH TO 4 MONTHS

    Focus for this age

    • Physical care
    • Bonding to mother
    • Visual stimulation
    • Gentle physical handling

    Emotional development milestones

    • Attachment of baby to adult(s) taking place
    • Early trust develops
    • Eating/sleeping schedules vary greatly
    • By 4 months can be comforted when unhappy

    Social development milestones

    • Turns head toward familiar voice
    • Will begin to smile when talked with or held
    • By two months shows excitement and pleasure when held
    • Visually attracted to bright colors and contrasts
    • By two months may gurgle to get attention
    • Appears to enjoy being held

    Physical development milestones

    • By 6-8 weeks can move head from side to side
    • Can lift head when placed on tummy by about 6 weeks
    • Begins to notice hands by around 6 weeks
    • May roll over by 3-4 months

    Language/intellectual development milestones

    • Crying is main source of communication (when wet, hungry, frightened, uncomfortable, or lonely)
    • Make gurgle throaty sounds by 4 months

    What Parents Can Do...

    • Talk to baby
    • Hold baby face to face, especially during the first month, when singing or talking
    • Be flexible about eating and sleeping routines
    • Hold baby during feeding times
    • Take baby for walks and talk about the sounds, trees, etc.
    • Have playtime with baby: peek-a-boo, read stories, talk and touch body parts (nose, chin, hand)
    • Shake a rattle and slowly move it so baby follows with his/her eyes

     

    Toys for Babies

    Make playtime safer and opt for unfinished (or no-VOC paint) solid wood toys, and PVC-Free plastic toys.  Conventional stuffed toys are also notorious for being stuffed with off-gassing foam fillers, not the kind of stuff you want your children to be playing, cuddling or sleeping with!

    Consider shopping for stuffed toys that are made of organic, untreated cotton, hemp, or wool materials.  Safer stuffed toys usually mean that they have not been treated with any nasty flame retardants but you just to be safe you can always search for product names, brands or toy types on HealthyStuff.org to see if testing has revealed any recalls or toxic chemicals. 

    • Music Box
    • Crib Mobile
    • Soft Cloth Ball
    • Teething Toys
    • Crib Mirror (Unbreakable)
    • Busy Box
    • Ceiling Posters
    • Large Plastic Keys, Balls, Rings
    • Rattle (At Four Months)

     

    4 TO 8 MONTHS

    Focus for this age

    • Responsive physical care
    • A close relationship with a special adult
    • A safe play environment

    Emotional development milestones

    • Attachment of baby to adults occurs
    • Early trust develops
    • Eating/sleeping schedules becoming more regular
    • Enjoys playing peek-a-boo and begins to grab at blanket
    • Uses cry to call for attention, not always a distress call

    Social development milestones

    • Enjoys being held
    • Smiles to show pleasure
    • Less smiling around strangers (by 8 months)

    Physical development milestones

    • Can roll over
    • Sits with support, then alone by 8 months
    • Begins to push feet against floor or lap and then bounces
    • Can see an object, then opens hand to grasp it
    • Passes toys from hand to hand

    Language/intellectual development milestones

    • Babbles and coos
    • Looks when name is called
    • Imitates sounds
    • Repeats interesting actions
    • Continues to develop eye-hand coordination

    What Parents Can Do...

    • Talk to baby often
    • Read to baby daily
    • Allow floor time for wiggling, and eventually, crawling
    • Put toys just out of reach
    • Place objects in boxes or cans with lids to make noise
    • Play peek-a-boo and hide toys under a blanket or diaper
    • Hold baby during reading or feeding times
    • Establish routines in baby's daily life (bathing, meals and snacks, naps, bedtime)
    • Imitate baby's sounds
    • Freeze a wet washcloth for baby to teethe on and mouth
    • Talk calmly to a crying baby
    • Do not shake or toss baby in the air
    • Hold baby close to a mirror and talk about baby's face

     

    Toys for Babies

    • Music Box
    • Small Toys To Grasp
    • Teething Toys
    • Balls
    • Push and Pull Toys
    • Rattles
    • Books
    • Busy Box or Other Noisy Toy

     

    8 TO 14 MONTHS

    Congratulations! During this time your busy baby is beginning to enter the first stages of toddlerhood. Toddlers come in all shapes and sizes, but toddler development at 12-15 months typically has a few things in common. 

    This is a special time for your child - as they grow from baby to toddler. It also is an important time for your toddler socially and emotionally, as separations anxiety starts to peak from 14 months.  Your little one will now begin to show empathy - for example, he might look sad or get upset when he sees someone else crying.  Empathy is about understanding how others might be feelings - a crucial part of forming relationships with people as your child gets older.

    Your toddler might stand up without needing help from you or the furniture in these months, and will probably start to walk on his own.  As he gets better at walking, he might climb stairs. Some children won't walk alone until 15-18 months, so try not to worry too much.

    Here's what your toddler might be doing, how you can help:

    Focus for this age

    • Mobility increases and infant begins to walk
    • Infant can make choices
    • Language use and understanding increases

    Emotional development milestones

    • Strong attachment to adult(s)
    • Fears can be shown, especially to things such as Santa, clowns, fast moving objects and large dogs
    • Infant can tantrum when frustrated

    Social development milestones

    • Smiles easily and shows enjoyment of people
    • Demonstrates signs of independence
    • Beginning of understanding that some behaviors are acceptable and some are not
    • Watches people and their activities
    • Prefers to be with others while playing

    Physical development milestones

    • Enjoys crawling, walking around furniture, & standing
    • Can pick up tiny objects (uses thumb and fingers well)
    • Very oral - everything goes in mouth
    • Develops arm and hand control
    • Enjoys taking off clothes, climbing up and onto furniture, & crawling up stairs

    Language/intellectual development milestones

    • look for one or two single wors at around 12 months, and up to six words (or maybe more!) by 15 months. 
    • Uses names of familiar objects and people (for example, aball - and say 'no' and 'oh-oh
    • Loves to imitate actions of others
    • Connects words to objects
    • Looks at books and chooses them
    • May scribble randomly
    • May stand without help 

    What Parents Can Do...

    • Show pleasure in baby's abilities
    • Baby proof the home (cover outlets, put away breakables, check safety of plants)
    • Help baby practice pulling up, walking, and climbing
    • Watch for small objects that baby can choke on and remove from play area
    • Read to baby using simple books
    • Play simple games
    • Take walks together
    • Name objects you see
    • Encourage baby to play games of imitation (sounds, words, pointing, body parts)

    Toys For Babies

    • Small Riding Toys
    • Push & Pull Toys
    • Balls
    • Stacking or Nesting Toys
    • Pictures, Books, Simple Puzzles
    • Crayons (With Supervision Only)
    • Busy Boxes
    • Teething Toys
    • Shape Boxes or Balls (To Drop Blocks Into)
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